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FEATURED ARTISTS

At Rod Stelter Jeweler, we are enchanted with the finely detailed craftsmanship of Native American silver and turquoise jewelry. On this page we honor the artisans in our collection with photos and information on their silver work. Heritage is important to us and we're proud to offer fine silver turquoise jewelry rich with Native American history.

MANNY GOODMAN OR VICTOR CEDARSTAFF

The Legend of Bolo Ties

Bootlace tie, bola tie, cowboy tie, gaucho tie, or the most common name - bolo tie. All are designed with a thin, laced or braided string-like material clasped together by a slide, through which the string is strung using tips at the ends. 

One story has it that Manny Goodman, the owner of a New Mexico craft store in the 1930s, came up with the bolo tie. Another version has Arizona silversmith Victor Cedarstaff chasing wild horses when his silver-bordered hatband slipped off and his hat flew away. When he retrieved the hat, he placed the band around his neck for safekeeping, giving him the idea for the bolo tie.  

In the 1940s, cowboys and Native American silversmiths felt the casual, rugged look of the bolo tie reflected their lifestyle. Nationwide popularity started in the 1950s with western TV shows and movies. The bolo tie is the official neckwear for Arizona and New Mexico. 

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